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January 17, 2009

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Camilo

I remember reading this book and agreeing with most of it; however, I thought the "peer group" argument was a tad overstated, because it seemed to originate in the secular / public school context, where the group considers itself the center. Parents and other institutions are expected to orient themselves to it. Just think about the architecture of typical American suburbia, where the elementary school is usually placed almost literally at the center of each neighborhood - think that's an accident?

I see these people at little league, and you can tell that the kids and their tribes run the show. Their parents are normally terrified.

No question: Gladwell is correct to make the argument - however for those who avoid the public school / secular context, they've already eliminated the major source of toxic peer group pressure now on the market (although Christians must do more than this, of course).

Splash

Good point, Camilo.

Boneman, I'm not sure I follow what you're saying your dilemma is (or maybe will be?) regarding your sons' education.

It almost sounds like you're saying they lack peers in their Classical Christian school? (If so, I can only say I went to one and never lacked.)

Seems to me you have peers regardless of your situation, unless you're literally chained in a cellar somewhere.

Heck, my 16-year-old sister has been home schooled since kindergarten and is by far the most social, uber-fashionable, popular and shockingly well-grounded of the five of us.

Surely you're not saying you'd play three-in-the-chamber Russian Roulette by putting them in a superior public school just because they'd have a bigger lot to run with and choose from. Seems like that would be the opposite of smart given Gladwell's point.

I don't think that's what you're saying, but I'm not sure.

To sum up, if I may go Zen for a moment, peers are. Better to favor the first things first IMHO.

RevK

"Train up a child," Deut. 6, love, prayer and grace!

Steve

Dang it! I knew there was a reason our families haven't gotten together in a while...

bro by birth

With my up-bringing (“Don’t Worry, Be Happy”), I'm not bent towards 'Blink'. It seems to me that it glorifies experts... an expert can identify fakes. Why would I educate my children to identify fakes?

Boneman

Bro - welcome to the blog.

Not sure where to start. You read books? Wow. I had no idea. That's great. When did you start? :)

That wasn't my read on Gladwell's book. The point about experts was that the sum of their training could manifest itself immediately - which shouldn't be a big surprise to us. His broader point was about the way our minds work - or don't, in the blink of an eye.

This post was more about The Tipping Point book which pointed out how peer groups are the most significant developmental factor in our children. Given that my 10 year old boy is the only boy in his class, Gladwell's point rattled my cage a little bit.

Later, bro.

bro by birth

BIG BRO QUOTE: "The point about experts was that the sum of their training could manifest itself immediately"

Agreed.

Isn't this why you and I both are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy so that we can educate our children on "being experts" of Biblical doctrine (private Christian school)?

I'm looking forward to 'Tipping Point'. I'm also a big fan of anyting Michael Lewis (economics) writes.

Camilo

Bro,

"... you and I both are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy so that we can educate our children on "being experts" of Biblical doctrine (private Christian school)?"

LOL! Or maybe WOL (for "weeping....")

Brett,

If your 10 year old needs some "boy time", there's always flag football. As the Dread Pirate Roberts says:

To the Pain...

Camilo

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